For Whom the Bell Rings: Differences in the Use of Ringtones and Mobile Music in Japan and the United States

Conference paper abstract 


 

Home 

Publications

Upcoming conferences

Past conference presentations

Research and Teaching

Fellowships and awards

Musical and service activities

 

Blog

 

Surveys and interviews of Japanese and American college students showed that they differed in their use of digital music downloads and ringtones because of dissimilar technological infrastructure and rollout in their countries. As American respondents were more likely to own PCs, they were more likely to own iPods and download music from the Internet; the Japanese were more likely to use mobile phones, due to a historically more user-friendly mobile internet environment. Nonetheless, cultural differences played a role in the social significance of ringtones. American students, whose cultural norms tended toward more extrovert behavior, were more likely to express their feelings toward others through ringtones and attach significance to other people's ringtones. Conversely, many Japanese adopted the norm of non-obtrusiveness by using vibration mode or restricting audible ringtones to the confines of their social groups. The paper expands on the role of cultural differences in the interpretation of ringtones.

アンケートとインタビューによると、アメリカと日本の大学生は国で異なるインフラと技術のロールアウトのため、デジタル音楽ダウンロードと着ウタの使用が異なることを示した。アメリカの回答者はほとんどPCを所有していたので、よりiPodを所有して、インターネットから音楽をダウンロードしていた。一方、日本が歴史的によりユーザーフレンドリーなモバイル環境である為、日本人はより携帯電話を使う。但し文化的な違いもモバイル音楽の使い方に大きな影響がある。文化的に外向性ふるまいの傾向があるアメリカの学生は日本人より着信音で他人に対する感情を表明、他人の着信音に意味を与える傾向があった。一方、マナー・モードを使ってる日本人がより多く、聞き取れる着信音を自分の家か友達の間のみに制限し、着信音にアメリカ人ほど意味を与えてない。論文は、着信音の解釈の文化的な違いを説明します。